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Safety Leadership Training

From Compliance to Culture (self-paced)


Course
Eric Svendsen

“From Compliance to Culture” is our “flagship” safety-leadership class that acts as a foundation for everything else we do to build and lead a culture of safety.

You’ll learn . . .
• how to tie safety to the core values of your workforce
• why compliance is not enough, and what to do about it
• how to build relationships of trust for full engagement
• a better way to coach safety behaviors and performance
• how to develop a “leadership presence” that makes them want to follow
• how to tailor your safety communication to appeal to any communication style
• how to lead and facilitate safety meetings that truly raise safety awareness

Who should attend?
This class is targeted to those in leadership (or perceived leadership) roles in the organization who are also tasked with leading a safety culture. This includes team leads, supervisors, managers, directors and even VPs of operations, production maintenance, EHS, engineering and reliability, as well as safety-team members, safety-committee members, and leadership from the corporate side, such as HR and Commercial.

Corporate License Available! Contact us to learn more about our corporate licensing plans and enjoy significant discounts on enrollment fees:

admin @ safetybuiltin . com

Course Description

This is a workshop in the truest sense of the word, not a seminar or static class. It is a roll-up-your-sleeves, get-out-of-your-seat, skills-building experience that imparts real-world knowledge and skills for leading a safety culture in the work environment. The workshop is a radical culture-immersion experience that changes the way we think about safety and the way we behave in safety situations. It imparts a common language and vision around leading safety as a culture, develops leadership ability, builds communication and coaching skills, and equips participants with the tools necessary to lead a safety culture.
 
This is a college-style online class that utilizes blended learning methods to enhance the student’s learning experience. Participants view recorded sessions of a live workshop, submit assignments, take unit quizzes, and record insights for application that are submitted to and personally graded by a qualified instructor who provides feedback and answers the student’s content questions along the way.


“We recently worked with the development team from safetyBUILT-IN during a major and extended safety-leadership development initiative for our company.  The primary objectives were to improve levels of leadership engagement with frontline employees, enhance leadership ‘presence’ at our field locations, and build the leadership capabilities of our 350+ managers and supervisors so that they in turn could begin leading a safety culture based on our organizational values and goals.  We set an aggressive target goal to reduce our OSHA recordable incidents by 25% by the end of that program year.  I am happy to report that due in large part to the efforts by the safetyBUILT-IN team, we actually exceeded that goal by a large margin, reducing our incidents instead by 40% and our severity rate by 65%.  I am pleased to recommend safetyBUILT-IN services to any organization that is currently striving to attain higher levels of safety performance and a stronger organizational leadership culture.

    --Brian McGuire, Director, Health and Safety, DCP Midstream
 


Workshop Outline

I.    Leading Safety as a Core Value
Safety culture starts with the way we think about and what we believe about safety. Culture is about people and relationships, not about compliance to regulations. Safety must be taken out of the category of “highest priority,” and placed in the category of “core value” before it can become a culture. This section is the paradigm shift (or turning point) of the session for attendees. Core values are identified and connected to safety, as are the differences between priorities and values. Participants come away with the clear differences between leading safety as a culture and following safety as a compliance regulation.

II.    Building Employee Engagement for a Stronger Safety Culture
There is a proven correlation between higher levels of employee engagement and a stronger commitment to safe-work behaviors. Engaged employees are five times less likely to have an accident, seven times less likely to have a loss-time injury, and they cost the organization one-sixth the cost of unengaged employees.  They are natural owners of their environment, are actively look for opportunities to contribute, and are natural champions of leading a safety culture—if we just let them lead!  This unit explores the “how-to”s and advantages of building employee engagement and ownership in our employees.  Participants discover how to apply the drivers of engagement specifically to their own environment.

III.    Understanding and Using Safety-Leadership Styles
Real communication takes place only through employee engagement. That starts by understanding how people think and behave in response to our message. It entails that we adjust our leadership-communication style to maximize engagement and transfer ownership for safety to our listeners. This section focuses on how to lead situationally, as well as how to identify and use your own personal safety-leadership styles to engage people in safety conversations. Participants work to determine what leadership styles best fit different situations, and how best to communicate a safety culture to those who “just don’t seem to get it.”

IV.    Leading Safety so that Others Want to Follow
Leadership can be observed in our communication, in our passion, in our authenticity, and in our accessibility.  People follow leaders who exhibit a strong leadership presence, who know what they believe about safety, and who communicate it with authenticity and passion.  This section focuses on building safety-leadership skills, leadership presence, relationships of trust, responsibility v. culpability, and genuine care and concern for the people who look to you for guidance.  Participants learn essential leadership and communication skills to engage a safety culture and are coached on those skills through safety-engagement scenarios.

V.    Improving the Effectiveness of Our Safety Talks
This unit builds on the previous unit by elaborating on best practices for engaging employees in safety meetings, safety talks, pre-job meetings, general production meetings, and other venues for safety communication.  Participants prepare for and deliver two separate safety-meeting scenarios (a general safety meeting and a pre-job safety meeting) and are coached on improvements.  The unit also covers and uses various tools for holding effective safety meetings, including a pre-job meeting form to help guide participants in creating a meaningful discussion around safety while building safety into each production/operations meeting.

VI.    Coaching Safety-Leadership Performance and Behaviors
Safety leadership must be reinforced through coaching, and coaching must be done in a way that transfers ownership for performance and behavioral changes to the person who is being coached.  Our coaching method starts with communicating a concrete goal against which current levels of performance and behaviors are measured.  Participants learn established coaching principles, how to generate options for improvements with the person they are coaching, and how to transfer ownership for those improvements and gain a solid commitment for improvements from the person who is being coached.  Participants also engage in a real-world coaching situation and report the results.

VII.    Coaching On-the-Spot Unsafe Behaviors
When observing an unsafe behavior, the first step is to stop the action and get the employee to a safe place.  But then we must engage the employee in a conversation about our safety-culture goals, behaviors and their consequences, and core values.  They must be internally motivated to do the right thing even when no one is looking, and that comes only through helping them connect safety to their own core values. This unit introduces a coaching model that is tailored to each participant and applied to a number of safety-engagement scenarios.

VIII.    Making the Most of Our Time in the Field (and on the Floor)
Safety cultures are significantly impacted by the degree to which leadership is “present” in the day-to-day activities of the workforce and the extent to which they make a point to observe the work practices of their teams.  This is best accomplished through regularly scheduled safety-leadership walkthroughs.  But leaders must go beyond the typical management safety audit and focus instead on leadership engagements with their employees to ensure process-safety integrity with safety-critical tasks.  This section emphasizes the differences between management walk-arounds and safety-leadership walk-arounds, explores the common causes of missed leadership opportunities during these walk-arounds, suggests the DOs and DON’Ts of intelligence-gathering questions, and lays out a strategy for maximizing our time in the field.  Participants prepare for (and submit) a safety leadership walkthrough at their job site.

IX.    How Do We Develop Best Practices for Safety Leadership
Now that we know and understand the principles of safety leadership, how do we tailor them to our environment? Participants brainstorm real-world applications of the safety-leadership principles and work out an action plan to lead safety as a culture in their own environments. The session ends with a signed safety-leadership commitment from the participant.


Participant comments from past workshops

"I honestly believe that the information shared during the meeting was ‘the missing link’ between where we are and where we want to be in regards to safety performance. I had a major ‘a-ha’ moment during the training. I hope this is shared with the rest of our company with an emphasis on management and leadership. I have personally committed to implementing the training both in my professional and personal life."

"Best program of this type I have been part of in my 36 years in the oil and gas industry."

"This program changed the way I look at safety and it will help instill safety as a core value."

"This is by far the best safety training I have ever encountered in all my work experience. Keep up the good work; I can't wait to start spreading the seeds."

"This program really had a great message. This is my first exposure to safety-leadership training and it really helped me put safety in the right perspective."

"You guy’s did a great job putting this together; one of the best programs I have gone through. I think everyone in the company should go through this.”

"I believe this was the best information that I have been given at a conference or training seminar in my 26 yrs as a supervisor. GREAT JOB."

"By far the best safety training ever."

"One of the best programs I've been a part of in my career, and the best I've experienced at our company."

"The course was one of the better I’ve attended for the 20 or so years that I have been attending events of this type."

"I thought this program was an OUTSTANDING training event. The facilitators did an excellent job with the material, and the content of the material was exactly what supervisors (and hourly employees) need to help promote our safety culture. I fully support the idea to make this training MANDATORY in all of the company's field offices for supervisors and hourly employees."

"Best program I have attended in my 15 years on the job."

"Fantastic program. Thank you!"

"This training should be offered to everyone in a leadership role or future leadership role with the company. One of the best safety training programs I have ever been a part of."

"Great program--not what I thought it would be."

"This was truly one of the better seminars that I have attended. I would recommend this material be applied company wide.”

“I thought this was a great session.  The facilitator was engaging and knowledgeable.  I think that I gained more actual and valuable tools in this session than any other leader coaching session we have had – will be able to use immediately!”

“I definitely learned a lot during the session and most importantly left at the end of it with a feeling that I now have tools that I can use immediately to help me improve the engagement of my team members.”

 

Here is the course outline:

1. Rethinking What We Believe About Safety

Safety culture starts with the way we think about and what we believe about safety. Culture is about people and relationships, not about compliance to regulations. Safety must be taken out of the category of “highest priority,” and placed in the category of “core value” before it can become a culture. This unit is the paradigm shift (or turning point) of the session for attendees. Core values are identified and connected to safety, as are the differences between priorities and values. Participants work through exercises to define the differences between leading safety as a culture and following safety as a compliance regulation.

2. Building Engagement for a Stronger Safety Culture

An engaged employee works with purpose, has higher job satisfaction, thinks like an owner, has higher levels of passion about the job, and more readily embraces the values and goals of the organization. To the extent that the organization promotes safety and safety leadership as one of its values, to that extent the engaged employee will embrace those same values for himself. This unit focuses on the significance and drivers of employee engagement as a tool for building a sustainable safety culture.

3. Maximizing Your Safety-Leadership Style

Leadership is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. Different situations, as well as different employees, call for different leadership styles. In this unit, you'll discover your own preferred safety-leadership style(s), and learn when they are effective and when you'll need to change your style to accommodate he new situation.

4. The Importance of "Leadership Presence"

When you think about someone you believe to be a strong leader, chances are you'll identify attributes that can physically be "seen" in that person--in their decisions, in their actions, and in their behaviors. Who leaders ARE is typically reflected in what they DO as leaders. This is what we refer to as a "leadership presence," and it's absolutely necessary for driving a safety culture.

5. Improving the Quality of Safety Communication

One if the best ways to communicate a safety culture is through our safety meetings. Regardless of industry or type of safety meeting, the meeting leader usually ends up reading the meeting instead of leading the meeting. We are often far too tethered to our notes, our slides, our JSA/JHA forms, or our tailgate-meeting checklist to conduct a safety meeting that actually accomplishes the goal of raising awareness in the minds of the participants. The key to better safety meetings is engagement, in which the meeting leader succeeds in getting the meeting participants to be fully vested in the topic, to view the topic as wholly relevant to them, to give undivided attention to the message, and to actively (and even enthusiastically) participate in and contribute to that meeting. This unit focuses on changing our approach to safety meetings and transforming the typical check-the-box safety meeting into an engaging conversation that will linger in the minds of participants long after the meeting has ended.

6. Coaching Safety Performance and Behaviors

Training is not development. Safety leadership must be reinforced through coaching, and coaching must be done in a way that transfers ownership for performance and behavioral changes to the person who is being coached. They must be internally motivated to do the right thing, and that comes only through helping them connect the dots between safety and their own core values. This unit focuses on a structured coaching model that allows participants to engage their direct reports in a meaningful discussion about safety-performance improvements.

7. Coaching Unsafe Behaviors On the Spot

The G.R.O.W. model is a great tool to coach safety performance in a scheduled, methodical way. But sometimes you'll need to coach behaviors and performance as soon as you see them happen. For that we will use our "Have a S.E.A.T." coaching method, which is still based on G.R.O.W. but tailors it to specific, on-the-spot behaviors.

8. Making the Most of Your Leadership Walkthroughs

Whether the context of your supervision is "in the field" or "on the floor" (or someplace else!) it's imperative for purposes of leadership and relationship-building that you are "present" with your workforce often. Yet visiting the plant, the line, the work site, or the field location in a random, unplanned way often results in missed opportunities to lead both personal safety and process safety. This unit emphasizes the need for structured leadership walkthroughs, for planning and preparing for site visits ahead of time, for building relationships of trust with front-line employees, and for asking intelligence-gathering questions that simultaneously check for required competencies and ensure that process-safety practices are sound.

9. Developing Best Practices for Safety Leadership

Now that we know and understand the principles of safety leadership, how do we tailor them to our environment? In this unit participants brainstorm real-world applications of the safety-leadership principles and work out an action plan to lead safety as a culture in their own environment. The session ends with a signed safety-leadership commitment from participants. This unit consists of several assignments. Please complete them in the order they appear.

10. FCTC Exam

"From Compliance to Culture" Comprehensive Exam

Completion

The following certificates are awarded when the course is completed:

Safety Culture Leader
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